Gruszka, Katarzyna, Scharbert, Annika Regine, Soder, Michael. 2017. Leaving the mainstream behind? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles . Ecological Economics 131, 485-498.


BibTeX

@ARTICLE{Gruszka2017,
title = {Leaving the mainstream behind? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles },
author = {Katarzyna Gruszka and Annika Regine Scharbert and Michael Soder},
year = {2017},
doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2016.09.021},
url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800916300866},
volume = {131},
language = {EN},
pages = {485-498},
journal = {Ecological Economics},
abstract = {In the wake of the economic crisis, a number of student organizations and researchers highlighted the lack of pluralism and heterodox approaches in economics curricula. The relevance of pluralism becomes clear once set within the implications of a given scientific discourse on reality (e.g. economics and policy making). This study explores the role of instructors in co-constructing the pluralism discourse and debates, while recognizing the role of institutional obstacles to change within the discipline. An empirical field study is conducted with lecturers in introductory economics courses at the WU Vienna University of Economics and Business where they place themselves within the pluralism discourse via a Q-study - a mixed method employed for studying subjectivity in socially contested topics. In Q, a set of statements undergo a sorting procedure on a relative ranking scale, followed by factor-rendering. Four voices are identified: Moderate Pluralist, Mainstreamers, Responsible Pluralists, and Applied Pluralists. The implications of their ideas are discussed from the viewpoint of discursive institutionalism, stressing the role of ideas and discourse in institutional change. Although a discursive readiness for changes towards more pluralism is claimed, strategies for overcoming the difficulties on the institutional level need to be developed. },
}

Abstract

In the wake of the economic crisis, a number of student organizations and researchers highlighted the lack of pluralism and heterodox approaches in economics curricula. The relevance of pluralism becomes clear once set within the implications of a given scientific discourse on reality (e.g. economics and policy making). This study explores the role of instructors in co-constructing the pluralism discourse and debates, while recognizing the role of institutional obstacles to change within the discipline. An empirical field study is conducted with lecturers in introductory economics courses at the WU Vienna University of Economics and Business where they place themselves within the pluralism discourse via a Q-study - a mixed method employed for studying subjectivity in socially contested topics. In Q, a set of statements undergo a sorting procedure on a relative ranking scale, followed by factor-rendering. Four voices are identified: Moderate Pluralist, Mainstreamers, Responsible Pluralists, and Applied Pluralists. The implications of their ideas are discussed from the viewpoint of discursive institutionalism, stressing the role of ideas and discourse in institutional change. Although a discursive readiness for changes towards more pluralism is claimed, strategies for overcoming the difficulties on the institutional level need to be developed.

Publication's profile

Status of publication Published
Affiliation WU
Type of publication Journal article
Journal Ecological Economics
Citation Index SSCI
WU Journalrating 2009 A
WU-Journal-Rating new FIN-A, STRAT-B, VW-C, WH-B
Language English
Title Leaving the mainstream behind? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles
Volume 131
Year 2017
Page from 485
Page to 498
Reviewed? Y
URL http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800916300866
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2016.09.021

Associations

People
Gruszka, Katarzyna (Details)
Scharbert, Annika Regine (Former researcher)
Soder, Michael (Details)
Organization
Institute for Ecological Economics IN (Details)
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